Rogue's gallery

Georgian glass of any quality commands significant prices.  It is therefore important to be sure that the glass you are buying is indeed from the period, and is sound in every way.  Unfortunately, over the years, Georgian glass has been copied extensively due to its inherent elegance, sometimes with no intent to deceive, and sometimes with that very thought in mind.  This section of the web site features Georgian-style glasses that have passed through our hands and which should be avoided; and some insights as to how to identify them.

Facon de Venise wine glass, probably 20C - a beautifully made facon de Venise style wine glass which is far too common to be 18th century. The knops are moulded rather than hand-pincered and there is usually insufficient age on the glass. Probably made in the early 20th century by somebody such as Stevens & Williams or Whitefriars.

 

Double series opaque twist ale glasses, probably 20C - nicely made Georgian-style DSOT ale glasses where the brightness of the metal, the bowl shape and the shape of the foot all negate them being 18th century.

 

Edwardian wrythen-moulded dwarf ale glass, probably early 20C - nicely made Georgian-style wrythen-moulded dwarf ale glass where the brightness of the metal is the main clue to it not being 18th century.

 

Edwardian engraved facet cut stem wine glass, early 20C - beautifully made Georgian-style facet cut stem wine glass where the quality of the engraving, the brightness of the metal and the lack of striation in the metal of the bowl (but not the foot) offer the main clues to it not being 18th century.

 

Edwardian engraved dwarf ale glass, early 20C - nicely made Georgian-style dwarf ale glass where the quality of the engraving and the brightness of the metal offer the main clues to it not being 18th century.

 

Victorian trumpet bowled wine glass with folded foot, 19C - Georgian-style wine glass where the flatness of the foot and the everted rim of the trumpet bowl are the main clues to it not being 18th century.

 

Italian (probably) multi spiral air twist wine glass, 20C - Georgian-style air twist wine glass where the soda metal used, the shape of the bowl, the slackness of the twist and the lack of age are the main indications of it not being 18th century.

 

Modern baluster wine glass in the Georgian style, 20C - baluster wine glass where the brightness of the metal, and the heavily everted rim of bowl are the main indications of it not being 18th century.

 

Victorian engraved wine glass in the Georgian style, 19C - single series opaque twist wine glass where the brightness of the metal, the broad enamel tape in the stem, and the bubbles in the base of the bowl are the main indications of it not being 18th century.

 

Probably a 19th century copy of an ale glass in the Georgian style - multi spiral air twist ale glass where the thickness of the stem, and the loose air twist spiral are the main indications of it probably not being 18th century.

 

A heavy baluster goblet with a drop knop - a heavy baluster wine goblet with a tulip shaped bowl and a teared drop knop. Unfortunately the foot up to the bottom of the knop is a replacement and is of a lighter coloured metal. Look out for unnatural joins in the stem of a glass.

 

A double series opaque twist wine glass - a double series opaque twist wine glass with an ogee bowl and conical foot. Unfortunately the bowl and the rest of the glass didn't start out together. The bowl is English lead glass and the stem/foot of Dutch soda metal. Look out for unnatural straight line join where the bowl meets the stem.

 

A mixed twist wine glass - a mixed twist wine glass with a funnel bowl and conical foot. The colour of the metal is too bright on this glass which also has a chamfered rim. Although chamfered rims are occasionally seen on very early Georgian glasses, a mid-century glass such as this should have a fire softened rim. The twist is also wrong and doesn't extend to the edge of the stem as it should.

 

 

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