COLOURED GLASS

Coloured glass has been around as long as glass has been produced.  Early glass was coloured by accident due to the impurities that existed in the raw materials used but it didn't take long for glasssmiths to recognise the attraction of coloured glass, and various elements and ores were deliberately introduced to the molten glass to produce the desired effects.  The early Egyptians and other Middle Eastern countries were producing coloured beads and vessels thousands of years before the birth of Christ, and the Romans produced wonderful, colourful works of art based on the knowledge they accrued from their invasions of these nation states.  British 18th century Georgian coloured glass is more limited in its scope with Bristol Blue and Bristol Green colours the most widely known and collected.  The link with Bristol is probably due to its being used as a port to export the goods more than as the city of manufacture, although it is known that some blue glass (for instance that of Isaac Jacobs) was made in that city.  For an overview of coloured glass through the ages read "Antique Coloured Glass" by Keith Middlemas.



Georgian North Bohemian milchglas decanter

Georgian North Bohemian milchglas decanter

This is what we believe to be a North Bohemian, hand-enameled and gilded, Georgian, milk glass decanter and stopper dating from the late 18th century, c1780.   A similar decanter with a different enameled scene can be seen on the web site for Auktionhaus Dr. Fischer at https://www.auctions-fischer.de/kataloge/online-kataloge/266-ii-europaeisches-glas-studioglas.html?kategorie=99&artikel=80069&L=&cHash=740107be73.
 
The decanter is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows the age related wear and tear to the rim of the base commensurate with some 200 years of use.  The pontil mark at the base of the decanter has been polished out.
 
The neck of the...

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Price: £225.00

Green export glass, hollow stem

Green export glass, hollow stem

This is what we believe to be a light green, English, export, balustroid wine glass dating from the mid 18th century, c1770. These glasses were made in England for export to the continent and reflected the continental preferences of the time.  They were also made of lightweight glass and had hollow stems to reduce carriage costs.

The glass is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows the age related wear and tear to both the rim of the bowl and to the rim of the foot commensurate with 200+ years of use.  It has a rough pontil mark on the foot which is nicely striated as is the bowl.

The glass has a cup bowl measuring 5.4 cm (2.2 inches) in diameter at the rim.   The bowl sits on a hollow stem...

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Price: £175.00

Light amethyst sugar bowl & cream jug - a friend's gift

Light amethyst sugar bowl & cream jug - a friend's gift

This is what we believe to be a set of Georgian, hand-blown, gilded, pale amethyst glass cream jug and sugar bowl dating from the turn of the 18th/19th centuries, c1800.  
 
The jug and bowl are in excellent condition for their age.  This means of course that they show age related wear and tear to the rims of the bases consistent with some 200 years of use. They have rough pontil marks on the bases.  
 
The jug is of baluster form in the light amethyst colourway, and measures 5.8 cm (2.3 inches) in diameter at the rim.  The main part of the jug is plain save for the remains of very rubbed gilding which may have expressed a message.  The conical foot measures 4.7 cm (1.9 inches) in...

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Price: £295.00

Sunderland blue cream jug and sugar bowl

Sunderland blue cream jug and sugar bowl

This is what we believe to be a set of Georgian, hand-blown, Sunderland Blue, wrythen-moulded glass cream jug and sugar bowl dating from the turn of the 18th/19th centuries, c1800.  
 
The jug and bowl are in excellent condition for their age.  This means of course that they show age related wear and tear to the rims of the bases consistent with some 200 years of use. They have rough pontil marks on the bases.  
 
The jug is of baluster form in the Sunderland blue colourway, and measures 6.5 cm (2.6 inches) in diameter at the turned over rim.  The main part of the jug is plain save for the wrythen moulding.  The base measures 6.7 cm (2.7 inches) in diameter.  The jug is...

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Price: £175.00

Sunderland blue wrythen-moulded cream jug

Sunderland blue wrythen-moulded cream jug

This is what we believe to be a hand blown, "Sunderland" blue, wrythen-moulded glass cream jug dating from the turn of the 18th/19th centuries, c1800.  The jug is in excellent condition for its age.  This means, of course, that it shows age related wear and tear to the rim of the foot consistent with some 200 years of use. It has a rough pontil mark on the foot. 
 
The jug has a baluster-shaped bowl measuring 6.7 cm (2.7 inches) in diameter at the folded over pouring rim.  The bowl is plain save for the wrythened ribbing and ends in a kicked-in base.  The base of the jug is 6.2 cm (2.5 inches) in diameter and the jug is 8.3 cm (3.3 inches) in height. There are no chips, cracks, significant scratches or any...

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Price: £75.00

Wrockwardine small wine or water jug

Wrockwardine small wine or water jug

This is what we believe to be a hand-blown, late Georgian, marbled green and white glass water or wine jug dating from the turn of the 18th/19th centuries, c1800, and probably blown at the Wrockwardine Wood Glass House in Shropshire.   
 
The jug is in excellent condition for its age.  It shows age related wear and tear to both the rim of the bowl and to the rim of the foot consistent with over 200 years of use. It has a rough pontil mark on the kicked-in base.
 
The jug has a baluster shape with a pouring rim measuring 5 cm (2 inches) in diameter.  The applied handle is affixed to the top first.  The jug is 12 cm (4.8 inches) in height.   There are no chips, cracks,...

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Price: £375.00


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